The Clara mine at Keswick, California

On this episode of Exploring Shasta County History, Jeremy Tuggle – Shasta Historical Society’s Education and Community Engagement Manager, takes you on another exciting mining adventure with his friend, Ralph Bentrim. This former mining property embraces Ralph’s property at Keswick. This mining property is a former Au (gold) mine called the Clara, which has been developed in parts to allow […]

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The Historic Foundation of the Mammoth Aerial Tramway

The Mammoth aerial tramway was sometimes referred to as an “aerial ropeway” which was built in 1905 for the United States Refining and Mining Company, the parent company of the Mammoth Copper Company of Kennett, by the Riblet Tramway Company of Spokane, Washington, for about $50,000. LOVE SHASTA COUNTY HISTORY?SEE: Exploring Shasta County History with Jeremy Tuggle: Bella Vista: A lumber […]

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Legendary Mining Lore: Gold Nuggets of History

Newcomers Frederic Rochon, a native of New York, and his Canadian partners Levi Longfield, and John Hayett, arrived from lower California and settled at Shasta together in the early months of 1870. After their arrival, they immediately located a placer mining claim on Spring Creek. After that, their mining activities took-off with them earning fair wages from this mining claim […]

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Simeon Fisher Southern and the Hazel Creek area

Author: Jeremy Tuggle – Education and Community Engagement Manager – Shasta Historical Society Simeon Fisher Southern, a native of Stephensburg, Kentucky, was born to Stephen Fisher Southern and Rebecca (Duncan) Southern, on September 6, 1822. As a boy, Simeon grew up on his father’s farm as a farmhand assisting his father when he wasn’t attending school. Southern was often referred […]

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Exploring Shasta County History with Jeremy Tuggle

Since July, 2019, Shasta Historical Society’s Education and Community Engagement Manager, Jeremy M. Tuggle has graciously allowed Shasta County News Source (SCNS) to publish and share his fascinating, well-written, and thoroughly researched articles about Shasta County’s rich History. Jeremy, who has authored two books, is a descendant of 11 pioneer families who helped settle Shasta County beginning in the 1850’s […]

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Exploring the rich history of McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park

Author: Jeremy Tuggle – Education and Community Engagement Manager – Shasta Historical Society If you’re ever in Northern California one of the premier destinations in Shasta County to visit is a natural wonder called Burney Falls. This magnificent water fall was designated as a National Natural Landmark in 1984 by the National Park Service. Yet, long before it was developed […]

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Rediscovering the Compton mine of the Shasta mining district

Author: Jeremy Tuggle – Education and Community Engagement Manager – Shasta Historical Society The Compton mine was a producer of gold which was located in the boundaries of the Shasta mining district about 1 1/2 mile south of the town of Keswick, and south of Keswick Dam. It is on the west side of the Sacramento River, at the mouth […]

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The historic Princess Ditch Trail; a modern hiking trail with an adit quartz mine?

Located 7.4 miles west of Redding on Muletown Road is the historic Princess Ditch. This ditch was formerly owned and operated by the Princess Hydraulic Mining Company of Leadville, Colorado. It was dug out by their employees during 1896 and it was completed in January of 1897. From the source of its water supply at Boulder Creek in the present […]

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The Temple Hotel

On June 12, 1891, the San Francisco Call newspaper published the following column about the future Temple Hotel and Masonic Lodge of Redding: “Another Masonic Temple The Redding Lodge Branching Out In Grand Style. The Masonic Building Association of Redding has so far completed arrangements as to order the signing of the contract for the erection of the Masonic Temple […]

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A history of Pollard Flat

Shenanigan’s Gulch was the original name of the present-day location of Pollard Flat just 35 miles north of Redding along Interstate 5. The origin of the name is unknown. Shenanigan’s Gulch originally started as a tent community and it was first settled by early Portuguese emigrants.The first route in the area which these emigrants used leading to and from Shenanigan’s […]

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